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Patients with Autoimmune Disorders Can Access MMJ in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Autoimmune Disorders: Types, Causes and Treatment Options
Written by Guest Author

When your body’s natural defense system can’t detect the difference between your own cells and foreign cells, it attacks normal cells, it is called autoimmune disorder. There are over 80 different types of autoimmune disorders. Their symptoms frequently overlap, making diagnosis difficult.

When the symptoms are difficult to handle such as fatigue, achy muscles, and swelling and redness, the good news is that medical marijuana can help ease those symptoms. 

 

What are Autoimmune Disorders

A disorder in which your immune system wrongly targets your body is known as an autoimmune disorder. 

Normally, the immune system protects us against pathogens such as bacteria and viruses. It sends out an army of fighter cells to attack these foreign invaders when it detects them.

Your immune system is able to distinguish between alien and native cells. The immune system misidentifies parts of your body, such as your joints or skin, as an alien in an autoimmune disorder. Autoantibodies are proteins released by the body that assault healthy cells.

 

Medical marijuana As An Alternative Option for Treatments of Autoimmune disorder

According to University of South Carolina researchers, the main ingredient of marijuana, tetrahydrocannabinol, may have another medical use: treating autoimmune disorder.

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. They are tiny, single-stranded, and non-coding. 

The capacity to change miRNA expression may be the key to treating autoimmune disorders like multiple sclerosis, arthritis, and type 1 diabetes, according to scientists.

Symptoms can come and go over time so if you want to see how medical marijuana can help, visit TeleLeaf.com today and gain access to an MMJ Card in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

If you qualify for an MMJ card in Baton Rouge, don’t hesitate to visit the website of Teleleaf.com and learn more about how medical marijuana can be an alternative treatment for patients with autoimmune disorders. 

 

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Basic info about Autoimmune Disorders

  • Doctors aren’t sure what causes the immune system to malfunction. However, some people are at a higher risk of developing an autoimmune disorder than others.
  • According to a 2014 study, women are more likely than males to have autoimmune illnesses – 6.4 percent of women vs. 2.7 percent of men. Often, the condition begins during a woman’s reproductive years (ages 15 to 44).
  • Multiple sclerosis and lupus, for example, are autoimmune disorders that run in families. Although not every family member will develop the same disorder, they will all inherit a proclivity for an autoimmune disorder.
  • Because autoimmune illnesses are becoming more common, researchers believe that environmental factors such as infections and exposure to chemicals or solvents may play a role.

Types of Autoimmune Disorders

There are more than 80 different autoimmune disorders. Here are 5 of the most common ones.

1. Type 1 Diabetes

Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that aids in blood sugar regulation. The immune system attacks and destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

Blood vessels, as well as organs such as the heart, kidneys, eyes, and nerves, can be damaged by high blood sugar levels.

2. Rheumatoid Arthritis

The immune system targets the joints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The joints become red, heated, aching, and stiff as a result of this onslaught. Unlike osteoarthritis, which typically affects people as they get older, RA can begin in your 30s or even earlier.

3. Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) causes damage to the protective coating that covers nerve cells in the central nervous system, known as the myelin sheath. The transmission speed of messages between your brain and spinal cord to and from the rest of your body is slowed when the myelin sheath is damaged.

4. Addison’s Disease

The adrenal glands, which generate the hormones cortisol and aldosterone as well as androgen hormones, are affected by Addison’s disorder. Cortisol deficiency can influence how the body consumes and stores carbohydrates and sugar (glucose). 

Aldosterone deficiency causes salt loss and increased potassium in circulation. Weakness, weariness, weight loss, and low blood sugar are all symptoms.

5. Psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis

When skin cells are no longer needed, they naturally develop and then shed. Skin cells multiply too quickly in psoriasis. 

The excess cells build up and cause inflammatory red patches on the skin, which are sometimes accompanied by silver-white plaque scales.

Causes of Autoimmune Disorders

Doctors aren’t sure what causes the immune system to malfunction. However, some people are at a higher risk of developing an autoimmune disorder than others.

According to a 2014 study, women are more likely than males to have autoimmune illnesses – 6.4 percent of women vs. 2.7 percent of men. Often, the condition begins during a woman’s reproductive years (ages 15 to 44).

Certain ethnic groups are more likely to develop autoimmune disorders. Lupus, for example, affects African-Americans and Hispanics at higher rates than Caucasians.

 

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Other Types of  Autoimmune Disorders treatments

Treatments can’t cure autoimmune disorders, but they can help manage the overactive immune system and lessen inflammation, if not completely eliminate it. 

The following medications are also used to treat these conditions:

  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) and naproxen (Naprosyn)
  • Immune-suppressing drugs
  • Treatments are also available to relieve symptoms like pain, swelling, fatigue, and skin rashes.

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